27
Jul
2015

Scientific American looked at the Data Science for Social Good fellowship project that seeks to evaluate and improve police department early warning systems for predicting officer behavior and adverse incidents. Another DSSG project, using predictive analytics to fight lead poisoning, was also recently featured in the Chicago Tribune.

15
Jul
2015

The world’s food supply sits at a precarious balance. Swings in agricultural production due to drought or extreme heat can lead to spiking food prices, ecological damage, civil unrest, and other severe consequences. In a recent talk, the CI's Joshua Elliott estimated that these “once-in-a-century” threats may be far more frequent in the future, necessitating global protective measures.

13
Jul
2015

The Array of Things, an urban sensing "fitness tracker for the city," hit two important milestones this summer as a pilot project launched on the University of Chicago campus and the effort received funding from the UChicago Innovation Fund and Argonne.

10
Jul
2015

Distinguished Fellow is the highest rank achievable by an Argonne researcher, a rare honor that acknowledges influential discoveries and technical leadership. Once a year, the national laboratory names a maximum of four staff members to this highly select company, placing them among Nobelists, R&D 100 winners, and holders of more than 800 patents.

07
Jul
2015

For better or worse, Wikipedia is now one of the world's foremost resources for information on everything from string theory to obscure Star Wars characters. The general public and -- even if they won't admit it -- many scholars use Wikipedia as a first-order reference on unfamiliar scientific subjects, before diving more deeply into the primary sources. But doing so places faith in the hands of the Wikipedia community, trusting that a page's editors have drawn upon the best scientific evidence in summarizing the topic for a more general audience.

30
Jun
2015

Since the first personal computer was developed 40 years ago, computational technology has dramatically changed human society. Unsurprisingly, this massive impact is also reflected in laws around the world, which struggle to keep pace with the mercurial advances of computers, smartphones, the internet, ebooks, and more. Starting on Monday, July 13, Randy Picker, professor at the University of Chicago Law School and Computation Institute Senior Fellow, will address these issues via his new Coursera course, “Internet Giants: The Law and Economics of Media Platforms.”

24
Jun
2015

The CI’s 2014-15 Inside the Discovery Cloud speaker series focused on collaboration, presenting pairs of speakers who are working together to unlock new knowledge through computation. Attendees heard about how new computational approaches are changing medicine, biology, social science, public policy, and more, and discover opportunities for new collaborations and student research projects. View the videos of these stimulating talks.

19
Jun
2015

More and more scientists are focusing their attention on how climate change will affect crop yield, farming practices, and food security for the world, and the massive implications for economics and health. Research on these important topics by Joshua Elliott of RDCEP is heavily featured in “Climate Change and Food Systems,” a new, free-to-download book published by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations.

18
Jun
2015

Reducing infant mortality, improving graduation rates for high school and first-generation college students, preventing home abandonment, and identifying legislative plagiarism are just some of the project goals for the 2015 Eric & Wendy Schmidt Data Science for Social Good Summer Fellowship. For fourteen weeks, 42 fellows in Chicago will work with nonprofit and government partners on these and other important problems, applying data mining, machine learning, statistical, and social science techniques to craft novel and useful solutions.
 

12
Jun
2015

The web of science seems to be immeasurably large, with researchers around the world churning out papers in hundreds of different fields. So when scholars try to describe and explain how scientists weave new threads into the fabric of knowledge, they typically stick to very small patches . But in a massive new analysis of nearly 20 million biomedical journal articles, Knowledge Lab researchers constructed the most complete picture yet of the network of biomedical science -- and in doing so, found that it was surprisingly compact.