18
Aug
2016

For the last two summers, fellows at Data Science for Social Good and researchers at the Center for Data Science and Public Policy (DSaPP) have worked with police departments around the country on developing a data-driven model for predicting police officer behavior.

08
Aug
2016

One of the world’s hubs of computation in particle physics sits inconspicuously at the corner of 56th Street and Ellis Avenue on the University of Chicago campus. Read how work from UChicago's ATLAS group and the Computation Institute helps support cutting-edge research at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

19
Jul
2016

From Kenya and Mexico to Syracuse and Tulsa, data in the hands of people with skills, expertise, and compassion can produce genuine benefits. For the 2016 edition of the Eric & Wendy Schmidt Data Science for Social Good (DSSG) Summer Fellowship, 42 fellows from around the world will work with partners in these locales and beyond on tackling challenges in education, policing, social services, criminal justice, and other vital real-world topics.

14
Jul
2016

As the Array of Things takes its final steps toward its public launch later this summer, it has locked in two new relationships that will support its research and education goals. Through an Innovation Generation grant from Motorola Solutions, the Array of Things (AoT) team will expand the high school curriculum built around the urban sensing project last year at Lane Tech High School, enabling more students to learn about technology, programming, and other important skills through the platform. Meanwhile, a new agreement with AT&T establishes the company as the wireless provider for the AoT nodes, transmitting terabytes of data to storage.

28
Jun
2016

Given its expeditionary namesake, it's only appropriate that Beagle -- the University of Chicago's supercomputer for biomedical research -- works with data from all around the world. But a recent project may qualify as the farthest-traveling data yet, as the HPC resource was used in a new genomic study of populations living in the Himalayan mountain range. 

21
Jun
2016

The traditional science research article doesn’t perform many tricks. When journals made the leap from paper to web, they largely settled on the static format of the PDF, a format that offers easy printing and little else. In the meantime, research across the spectrum of science has grown more data-intensive and computational, and programmers have developed exciting new ways to document, publish, share, and collaborate on projects. The ingredients are all there for a new kind of living, dynamic scientific publication.

26
May
2016

People at the University of Chicago study climate and energy from a variety of perspectives, including geophysics, computer modeling, law, economics, and molecular engineering. Yet the most immediate way to make a difference on climate change and sustainable energy is to look at our own campus, one of the largest consumers of energy in Chicago. Useful new solutions to reduce energy usage and cut cost could then be expanded to other universities and similar workplaces, a bottom-up contribution to complement larger-scale research.

18
May
2016

Cyberinfrastructure is the connective tissue for computational science, tying together the research projects, resources, software, data, networks, and people needed to make important discoveries. In an era where soon all research will be computational science, to varying degrees, the importance of building strong cyberinfrastructures to support that research grows -- as do the challenges. But what will the cyberinfrastructures of the future look like?

13
May
2016

Using data to better understand and improve cities is no longer a revolutionary new idea. Cities across the world now release data publicly and use data internally to drive better services, social scientists increasingly use “big” data and computation to study urban environments, and civic hacking groups create data-driven websites and apps to inform and benefit communities. But in many ways, these are just the low-hanging fruit of urban data science, which remains a young field with more promise than results.

09
May
2016

It's been almost a year since Chameleon, the experimental cloud computing testbed co-run by the Computation Institute and Texas Advanced Computing Center, went into full production for research use. Already, 600 users and 150 projects have used the system to test new uses and technologies for cloud computing, from finding unknown exoplanets to preventing cyberattacks. Last week, HPCwire spoke to CI Senior Fellow Kate Keahey and other members of the Chameleon team, surveying its early successes and previewing the innovations still to come.